The Cremation Society And A Polluted World

 In Cremation, Environment, natural burial

The Cremation Society and a polluted world do not make good bedfellows. It was scientists in America who made the statement that all forms of incineration are harmful to the environment. This includes cremation. The Cremation Society of Great Britain, which has charity status, was formed in 1874 and before the perils of incineration were understood. It promoted and still promotes cremation as a ‘rational, safe and dignified method of disposal of the dead’. That word safe needs to be questioned.

Bunging up the lungs

Burning creates hazardous substances. Filtration is not a solution because the waste is then officially deemed ‘hazardous waste’. What we should worry about is those microparticulates, tiny unburnt particles, that get into the lungs. Do we never learn? Back in 2200 BC, Zuri and her people needed the warmth and odour of the log fire in the hut. They wanted to retain the heat and so thatched the roof without an outlet for the fumes. Because those fumes built up, the carbon monoxide sterilised the hut, killing all insects, moulds and fungi. Consequently, the hut lasted decades but the people would have suffered with lung disease. They would not understand why. We, of course, have the science and yet choose to ignore it.

Carbon

The body contains 18% carbon and incineration releases it all within about an hour. The gas used to preheat and power the cremator releases more carbon. Further, there is carbon cost in building the cremators, not least in producing the firebricks. These have to be replaced every 18 months. Apart from releasing the carbon, cremation is such a waste. We incinerate all the protein and fats, and all the DNA, in our body and send it to the skies as poisonous fumes. Cremation is archaic and outdated by science.

Natural burial

We have an alternative to the Cremation Society and a polluted world. If we bury our body in a natural environment then most of the carbon can be locked up. This would go into a tree or be retained by the turf over the grave. This is one of factors supporting natural burial of which there are now over 300 sites in the UK. Also, instead of sinister invisible fumes heading skywards from a sterile crematorium, butterflies and birds will adorn your grave. Zuri would have appreciated this and it is, my friends, a true memorial.

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